Benefits of Milk Oolong Tea

Much the same as different teas, Milk Oolong tea offers a few medical advantages over the flavorful taste. Since this tea is of the most noteworthy quality, the taste shows signs of improvement and better each time you soak it, with the limit being up to seven times. Here are a couple of advantages that Milk Oolong tea can give you…

1: Consist of polyphenols that help destroy free radicals and boost overall health.

2: Relieves mental and physical stress.

3: Frequent consumption of Milk Oolong tea lowers body fat and reduces the risk of obesity.

Contributes to weight loss by decreasing fat.

4: Makes your skin cleaner and helps with some skin conditions such as eczema.

5: Prevents tooth decay while making your teeth stronger.

6: Contains minerals such as calcium, potassium, manganese, and magnesium that help with bodily health functions.

[bctt tweet=”7: Boosts mental alertness and can help improve thinking skills.” username=”belladeem”]

Indeed, there you have it! So what is Milk Oolong tea? It’s tea that tastes rich, smells velvety, and has season takes note of that suggest a flavor like sweet milk. This tea is an absolute necessity attempt on your tea drinking venture for its one of a kind drinking background. Attempt our Milk Oolong tea and let us know whether it winds up one of your top picks!

Advertisements

THE SCIENCE OF STEEPING TEA

It is likely there are instructions about how long to steep the leaves. For example, it may say: put tea bag in a cup, add proper amount of boing water and wait for three to five minutes to drink for black tea, and two to four minutes for green tea.

We all know that you can enjoy your tea that you have just brewed for 30 seconds as the same as a forgotten mug of tea that’s been steeping for 30 minutes, drinkable shouldn’t be your goal.

[Tweet “The taste will a depends on the type of tea you’re drinking”] But the antioxidant and caffeine levels all depend on the amount of time the leaves are in contact with the water. So how early is too early to pluck out a tea bag, and how long can you leave it in before passing the point of no return?

[Tweet “THE SCIENCE OF STEEPING TEA”]

To successfully get  the perfect timing, you first need to understand the chemical process at work when you pour hot water over tea leaves. Black, green, white, and oolong tea all come from the leaves and buds of the same plant, Camellia sinensis. (Herbal teas aren’t considered “true teas” because they don’t come from C. sinensis.)

Heat is being introduced to green and white tea leaves to dry them, limiting the amount of oxidation they get, while black and oolong tea leaves are exposed to oxygen before they’re dried, creating the chemical reactions that give the tea its distinct color and flavor. Damaging the tea leaves—by macerating them, rolling them gently, or something in between—helps expose the chemicals inside their cells to varying levels of oxygen.

Green and black teas contain a lot of the same chemical compounds that contribute to their flavor profiles and nutritional content. When the leaves are submerged in hot water, these compounds leach into the liquid through a process called osmotic diffusion, which occurs when there’s fluid on both sides of a selectively permeable membrane—in this case, the tea leaf. Compounds on the surface of the leaf and in the interior cells damaged by processing will diffuse into the surrounding liquid until the compounds in both the leaf and the water reach equilibrium. In other words, if given enough time to steep, the liquid in your mug will become just as concentrated with tea compounds as the liquid in your tea leaves, and the ratio will stay that way.

Osmotic diffusion doesn’t happen all at once—different compounds enter the water at different rates based on their molecular weight. The light, volatile chemicals that contribute to tea’s aroma and flavor profile dissolve the fastest, which is why the smell from a bag of tea leaves becomes more potent the moment you dunk it in water. The next group of compounds to infuse with the water includes the micronutrients flavanols and polyphenols, which are antioxidants, and caffeine. They’re followed by heavier flavanols and polyphenols such as tannins, which are the compounds responsible for tea’s bitter flavor.

 

 

Cold Steeping

[Tweet “Here’s a simple and easy way to make cold tea without hot water!”]

Energy efficient and simple, cold steeped teas have less  bitterness and less caffeine. Unlike “sun tea”, where you leave your tea in the sun to brew, there are no food safety concerns with cold steeping. Cold brewing also brings you a cleaner, less astringent cup. Any type of tea can be used but Green, White and Oolong teas produce the best cups. Herbal fruit teas also do well. Just experiment with your own favorite.

To make cold steeped tea simply add one teaspoon of loose leaf tea per cup of fresh cold water, place in a suitable container and leave in your fridge overnight (at least 8 hours). Strain out the leaves and enjoy!

Steeping your tea allows you to impart the nutrients found in the tea leaves to the water or liquid you are steeping the leaves in; however, over-steeping imparts more nutrients and flavors from the tea leaves, according to a study published in a 2007 issue of the “Journal of Chromatography.”

%d bloggers like this: